Long-running coal plant on Navajo Nation stops production
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — A massive coal-fired power plant that served customers in the West for nearly 50 years shut down Monday, the latest closure in a shift away from coal and toward renewable energy and cheaper power.
California sues e-cigarette maker Juul over ads, youth sales
WASHINGTON (AP) — California on Monday sued the nation’s biggest e-cigarette maker, alleging that Juul Labs deliberately marketed and sold its flavored nicotine products to teenagers.
South Dakota’s governor defends ‘Meth. We’re on it’ campaign
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — South Dakota sparked online guffaws Monday by rolling out an anti-drug campaign featuring people saying, “Meth, I’m on it,” and the governor said the backlash proves the effort to raise awareness is working.
Warren’s ‘Medicare for All’ plan reignites health care clash
WASHINGTON (AP) — Elizabeth Warren’s proposal to gradually move the country to a government-funded health care system has further inflamed the debate over “Medicare for All,” likely ensuring the issue will play a significant role in this week’s Democratic presidential debate.
Correction: Prescription Drugs story
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story Nov. 18 about the White House push for prescription drug legislation, The Associated Press misspelled the first name of the executive director of Families USA.
Trump backing off banning vaping flavors popular with teens
WASHINGTON (AP) — When President Donald Trump boarded Air Force One to fly to a Kentucky campaign rally two weeks ago, a plan was in place for him to give final approval to a plan to ban most flavored e-cigarettes.
New, old drugs may offer fresh ways to fight heart disease
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure.
Mailing free home HIV tests helps detect more infections
Mailing free home HIV tests to high-risk men offers a potentially better strategy for detecting infections than usual care. That’s according to a U.S.
No training, no gloves: Zimbabwe’s desperate childbirths
HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — When her contractions became unbearably painful, 18-year-old Perseverance Kanyoza rushed to a maternity hospital in Zimbabwe’s capital, Harare.
Warren pushes back on critics of her health care plan
WAVERLY, Iowa (AP) — Elizabeth Warren pushed back against critics of her newly released plan to phase in implementation of a single-payer health care system, insisting Saturday that she is “fully committed” to Medicare for All and that she plans to first build on existing health care programs because “people need help right now.” “My commitment to Medicare for All is all the way,” Warren told reporters, responding to critics who’ve questioned the timing behind the release of her implementation plan.
Big study casts doubt on need for many heart procedures
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — People with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying over the following few years, a big federally funded study found.
US approves new drug to manage sickle cell disease
U.S. regulators on Friday approved a new medicine that can help reduce extremely painful sickle cell disease flare-ups. The Food and Drug Administration approved Novartis AG’s Adakveo for patients 16 and older.
Warren says getting to ‘Medicare for All’ will take 3 years
WASHINGTON (AP) — Elizabeth Warren announced Friday that she would expand public health insurance during her first 100 days in office, but wouldn’t push for passage of a “Medicare for All” program until the third year of her presidency, a timeline that acknowledges how tough it will be to shift to a system of government-run health care.
White House seeks disclosure of actual health care prices
WASHINGTON (AP) — New rules from the Trump administration on Friday would require insurers and hospitals to disclose upfront the actual prices for common tests and procedures to promote competition and push down costs.
Will you get dementia? Many may not understand their risk
Many older American adults may inaccurately estimate their chances for developing dementia and do useless things to prevent it, new research suggests.
FDA warns Dollar Tree about flagged Chinese manufacturers
WASHINGTON (AP) — Government regulators have again warned Dollar Tree’s parent company about importing drugs and cosmetics that could be tainted due to improper product testing during manufacturing.
Texas baby born without much of his skin finally goes home
HOUSTON (AP) — A baby boy born in Texas without much of his skin is finally at home after months of treatment involving grafts of skin grown in a lab from his own cells.
US panel backs wider use of fish oil to prevent heart attack
WASHINGTON (AP) — Government health experts on Thursday recommended broader use of a prescription-strength fish oil drug to help many more patients at risk for heart attack, stroke and related health problems.
Vaping illnesses in US still rising, though at slower pace
NEW YORK (AP) — The number of vaping illnesses in the U.S. is still rising, but at a slower pace. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday said another 121 cases have been reported, bringing the total of confirmed and probable cases to 2,172.
Doctor accused of unnecessary surgeries held without bail
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — The website of a Virginia gynecologist describes his surgical skills as “unparalleled.” But federal prosecutors say many of the procedures Dr.
German lawmakers approve compulsory measles vaccine plan
BERLIN (AP) — Germany's parliament has passed a law requiring that children who attend school or daycare must be vaccinated for measles.
Schools closed in New Delhi as air quality dips for 3rd day
NEW DELHI (AP) — Schools in India’s capital are shut on Thursday and Friday after a thick gray haze of noxious air enveloped the city for the third consecutive day, and angry residents blamed authorities for holding an annual children’s race.
Overdoses possible in some student deaths on USC campus
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Police investigators are looking into drug overdoses as a potential cause of death among some of the nine students who have died this semester at the University of Southern California.
US superbug infections rising, but deaths are falling
NEW YORK (AP) — Drug-resistant “superbug” infections have been called a developing nightmare that could set medicine back a century, making conquered germs once again untreatable.
Ex-government health chief joins warnings about EPA proposal
WASHINGTON (AP) — A former top government environmental health official joined health experts on Wednesday in expressing alarm as the Trump administration moves forward with a proposal that scientists say would upend how the U.S.